Jesse /Chisholm/

[ born 1805 or 1806, died 4 MAR 1868 ]
in GEDCOM file chis.ged

Click this picture of Jesse Chisholm to load a 516K GIF image.(S36) "No one left his home cold or hungry."

NameJesse /Chisholm/
SexMale
BirthDate: 1805 or 1806
Place: Hiwassee region, East Tennessee, USA.
Child in Family: (F001)
DeathDate: 4 MAR 1868
Cause: From eating tainted bear meat.
BurialDate: MAR 1868
Place: Near Left Hand Spring, NE of Geary, Oklahoma, USA.
NoteClick this picture of Jesse Chisholm to load a 516K GIF image.(S36) "No one left his home cold or hungry."
Source: (S29)
Text: [ ed: some of the following is contradicted by other sources; eg., who Jesse's mother was. ] Jesse Chisholm was born in East Tennessee about 1805 or 1806, his father was Ignatius Chisholm(I002) and his mother was Martha Rogers Chisholm(I048) . Jesse had the trading and pioneer instinct born into him. His grandfather (Captain John Chisholm(I049) ) had his son, Ignatius (Ig.) , associated with him in business and left him in charge of his affairs when he sailed for England on a peculiar mission in May, 1797. Jesse Chisholm came west with the Cherokees and settled with them for a while in northwestern Arkansas. About 1825 he and his mother and his Aunt Talahina(I344) arrived at Fort Gibson and made a home there, and for over forty years he was a factor in the affairs in the southwest, not only in the old Indian Territory but also in Texas, New Mexico, Kansas, and Arkansas.
Source: (S29)
Text: Jesse Chisholm became a trader with the Indians and was known as a square shooter, a square dealer and a man with a straight tongue. Sam Houston spent about three in Oklahoma, then he left for Texas, arriving in Nacogdoches in April, 1832. He left all his property to his Indian wife Talahina (Tiana), who was a woman of character. We shall follow Sam Houston no further. It is probable that Jesse Chisholm and Sam Houston never met again, although for nearly forty years each was an active factor in adjoining commonwealths. The Rogers' blood flowed in the veins of Oklahoma's most useful citizen, Jesse Chisholm.
Source: (S29)
Text: Jesse Chisholm was known early as an honest trader, and by this honesty, became a peacemaker. He was not only interpreter for the U. S. Army officials but he had great influence among the red warriors. Everywhere he was a peacemaker and a pathfinder. At one time he was adopted into almost a dozen Indian tribes of Oklahoma. He was always a Good Samaritan. The wild Comanches knew they could capture white children in Texas and then sell them to Jesse Chisholm in Oklahoma. He had stores at different places; one two miles east of Asher, one at Council Grove, a few miles west of the present Oklahoma City; one near the mouth of the Little River, and another near the present town of Purcell. One of his greatest activities was his pack train, which was a traveling store on wheels. In reality it was a department store on mule-back. He early learned that the wild Indians did not like to come east into the timber section and hence he went to the wild Indians. He would equip his trains and go to the center of the Indian tribe. He packed his trains with things the Indians liked and admired, red calico, beads, paints, but he never took them whiskey. No written chronicle has been compiled on this great character from 1830, and his meager history is written in good deeds.
Source: (S40)
Text: This chart lists Jesse's mother as Corn Tassle's Sister (I003), which is consistant with other secondary sources, although it contraticts (S29).
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1815
Type: Emigrated to Spadra River in Arkansas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1825
Type: Moved to Fort Gibson
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1829
Type: Met Sam Houston at Fort Gibson
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1830
Type: Awarded contract for supplying corn
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1832
Type: Marked wagon trail with Robert Bean
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1833
Type: Moved to Edward's Store
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1833
Type: Interpreter for U. S. Army
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1834
Type: Chisholm and Rogers at council in Fort Gibson
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1834
Type: Accompanied Dragoon Expedition to Wichita Mountains
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1836
Type: Guided party to Little Arkansas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1836
Type: Married Eliza Edwards(I010)
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1837
Type: birth of William E. Chisholm(I013)
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1839
Type: Bought negro boy in Texas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1841
Type: Sold negro boy to Lucinda Edwards
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1843
Type: Treaty on Tehuacana Creek, Texas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1844
Type: Visited Fannin County, Texas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1844
Type: Interpreter at Council Grove, Texas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1846
Type: death of Eliza Edwards(I010)
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1846
Type: Treaty of U. S. on Tehuacana Creek
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1847
Type: Marries Sahkahkee McQueen(I015)
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1848
Type: Traded on the Brazos River in Texas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1848
Type: Aunt Jennie born
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1849
Type: Ransomed a Mexican boy and girl
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1850
Type: Council on the Concho River, Texas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1858
Type: Established trading post on Chouteau Creek, Cleveland County
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1858
Type: Established trading post at Council Grove in Oklahoma County
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1860
Type: Wm. E. Chisholm marries Hester Butler(I380)
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1861
Type: Conducts Exodus to Arkansas River, Kansas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1861
Type: Accompanies Creek Refugee Exodus to LeRoy, Kansas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1861
Type: Employed by Albert Pike, Confederate emissary among tribes on Washita
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1862-65
Type: On Arkansas River, Kansas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1863
Type: William E. Chisholm marries Julia Ann McLish(I235)
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1865
Type: Marks Chisholm Trail
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1865
Type: Present as negotiator and interpreter at peace council on the Little Arkansas
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1867
Type: Salt Springs in Blaine County
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1867
Type: Present as negotiator and interpreter, Medicine Lodge Peace Council
Event
Source: (S29)

Date: 1867
Type: Trading Camp, on N. Canadian, near site of Watonga
Source: (S02)
Text: Growing up, I was told stories of Jesse Chisholm, my great-great-great-grandfather.
Source: (S03)
Source: (S04)
Child in Family (F001)
HusbandI002Ignatius /Chisholm/1777 or 17781837
WifeI003? /?/ (Corn Tassle's sister)??
ChildrenI001MaleJesse /Chisholm/1805 or 18064 MAR 1868
I005MaleJohn /Chisholm/??
I006MaleWilliam R. /Chisholm/182118 FEB 1896
Spouse in Family (F003)
HusbandI001Jesse /Chisholm/1805 or 18064 MAR 1868
WifeI010Elizabeth /Edwards/?1846
ChildI013MaleWilliam Edwards /Chisholm/15 SEP 183719 NOV 1880
Parent in Family (F007)
FatherI001Jesse /Chisholm/1805 or 18064 MAR 1868
MotherI023Nannie /Bowles/??
ChildrenI014MaleJohn /Chisholm/??
I032MaleGeorge /Chisholm/??
Spouse in Family (F005)
HusbandI001Jesse /Chisholm/1805 or 18064 MAR 1868
WifeI015Sah-kah-kee /McQueen/??
ChildrenI016FemaleJennie /Chisholm/1848?
I033FemaleLucinda /Chisholm/??
I034MaleFrank (Jesse) /Chisholm/c. 1855?
I043FemaleMary /Chisholm/c. 1867?
I035? /Chisholm/??
I036? /Chisholm/??
Parent in Family (F006)
FatherI001Jesse /Chisholm/1805 or 18064 MAR 1868
ChildrenI017AdoptedMaleVincente /de Demencio/?1917
I018AdoptedMaleJackson /?/??
I019AdoptedMazimo /?/??
I020AdoptedFemaleGuadalupe /?/??
I021AdoptedCedra /Canales/??
I022AdoptedFemaleMariana /Fransito/??
I037Adopted? /?/??
I038Adopted? /?/??
I039Adopted? /?/??
I040Adopted? /?/??
I041Adopted? /?/??
I042Adopted? /?/??

Time Line


1800 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

1805 Birth

1810 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

1815 Emigrated to Spadra River in Arkansas

1820 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

1825 Moved to Fort Gibson 1829 Met Sam Houston at Fort Gibson

1830 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

1830 Awarded contract for supplying corn 1832 Marked wagon trail with Robert Bean 1833 Interpreter for U. S. Army Moved to Edward's Store 1834 Accompanied Dragoon Expedition to Wichita Mountains Chisholm and Rogers at council in Fort Gibson 1836 F003: Marriage Guided party to Little Arkansas Married Eliza Edwards(I010) 1837 birth of William E. Chisholm(I013) 1839 Bought negro boy in Texas

1840 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

1841 Sold negro boy to Lucinda Edwards 1843 Treaty on Tehuacana Creek, Texas 1844 Interpreter at Council Grove, Texas Visited Fannin County, Texas 1846 death of Eliza Edwards(I010) Treaty of U. S. on Tehuacana Creek 1847 F005: Marriage Marries Sahkahkee McQueen(I015) 1848 Aunt Jennie born Traded on the Brazos River in Texas 1849 Ransomed a Mexican boy and girl

1850 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

1850 Council on the Concho River, Texas 1858 Established trading post at Council Grove in Oklahoma County Established trading post on Chouteau Creek, Cleveland County

1860 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

1860 Wm. E. Chisholm marries Hester Butler(I380) 1861 Accompanies Creek Refugee Exodus to LeRoy, Kansas Conducts Exodus to Arkansas River, Kansas Employed by Albert Pike, Confederate emissary among tribes on Washita 1862 On Arkansas River, Kansas 1863 William E. Chisholm marries Julia Ann McLish(I235) 1865 Marks Chisholm Trail Present as negotiator and interpreter at peace council on the Little Arkansas 1867 Present as negotiator and interpreter, Medicine Lodge Peace Council Salt Springs in Blaine County Trading Camp, on N. Canadian, near site of Watonga 1868 Burial Death

Ancestor Tree

?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
I049
MaleJohn D. /Chisholm/
b. 1737? - 1742?
d. 1818
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
I002
MaleIgnatius /Chisholm/
b. 1777 or 1778
d. 1837
?
 ?? /??/
I348
MaleIgnatius /Sims/
b. ?
d. ?
?
 ?? /??/
I044
FemaleElizabeth /Sims/
b. ?
d. 1788?
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
I001
MaleJesse /Chisholm/
b. 1805 or 1806
d. 4 MAR 1868
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
I350
MaleOld Tassle /?/
b. ?
d. ?
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
I003
Female? /?/ (Corn Tassle's sister)
b. ?
d. ?
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/
?
 ?? /??/

Sources of this information:

(S29)

[ ed: some of the following is contradicted by other sources; eg., who Jesse's mother was. ] Jesse Chisholm was born in East Tennessee about 1805 or 1806, his father was Ignatius Chisholm(I002) and his mother was Martha Rogers Chisholm(I048) . Jesse had the trading and pioneer instinct born into him. His grandfather (Captain John Chisholm(I049) ) had his son, Ignatius (Ig.) , associated with him in business and left him in charge of his affairs when he sailed for England on a peculiar mission in May, 1797. Jesse Chisholm came west with the Cherokees and settled with them for a while in northwestern Arkansas. About 1825 he and his mother and his Aunt Talahina(I344) arrived at Fort Gibson and made a home there, and for over forty years he was a factor in the affairs in the southwest, not only in the old Indian Territory but also in Texas, New Mexico, Kansas, and Arkansas.

(S29)

Jesse Chisholm became a trader with the Indians and was known as a square shooter, a square dealer and a man with a straight tongue. Sam Houston spent about three in Oklahoma, then he left for Texas, arriving in Nacogdoches in April, 1832. He left all his property to his Indian wife Talahina (Tiana), who was a woman of character. We shall follow Sam Houston no further. It is probable that Jesse Chisholm and Sam Houston never met again, although for nearly forty years each was an active factor in adjoining commonwealths. The Rogers' blood flowed in the veins of Oklahoma's most useful citizen, Jesse Chisholm.

(S29)

Jesse Chisholm was known early as an honest trader, and by this honesty, became a peacemaker. He was not only interpreter for the U. S. Army officials but he had great influence among the red warriors. Everywhere he was a peacemaker and a pathfinder. At one time he was adopted into almost a dozen Indian tribes of Oklahoma. He was always a Good Samaritan. The wild Comanches knew they could capture white children in Texas and then sell them to Jesse Chisholm in Oklahoma. He had stores at different places; one two miles east of Asher, one at Council Grove, a few miles west of the present Oklahoma City; one near the mouth of the Little River, and another near the present town of Purcell. One of his greatest activities was his pack train, which was a traveling store on wheels. In reality it was a department store on mule-back. He early learned that the wild Indians did not like to come east into the timber section and hence he went to the wild Indians. He would equip his trains and go to the center of the Indian tribe. He packed his trains with things the Indians liked and admired, red calico, beads, paints, but he never took them whiskey. No written chronicle has been compiled on this great character from 1830, and his meager history is written in good deeds.

(S40)

This chart lists Jesse's mother as Corn Tassle's Sister (I003), which is consistant with other secondary sources, although it contraticts (S29).

(S02)

Growing up, I was told stories of Jesse Chisholm, my great-great-great-grandfather.

(S03)

(S04)


chis.ged Links


GCExport v 0.3, (c) 1998 Jesse Chisholm